Discussion:
OT Childhood books you still own and read.
(too old to reply)
Lady Nina
2007-12-12 00:29:39 UTC
Permalink
Following a comment by Simian that it had been over 28 years since he
read the hobbit I was thinking that it must be about the same and
thinking about my early reading. I vaguely remember the Janet and John
books. I know by the time we were living in Oxford (so I was 6/7) I'd
got to the end of the Primary school reading scheme. Then I started to
eat up the real books.

Lots of the worthy stuff Harriet Beecher Stowe, CS Lewis, George
MacDonald.

Classics like Treasure Island, Huckleberry Finn, White Fang.

I was going to say I've kept none of the above but I have a folio
edition of the Narnia books somewhere and a slip case of George
MacDonald. I don't read them though.

What I have kept and go back to;

A wrinkle in Time, probably the first sci-fi I read.

The entire Anne of Green Gables series. I still sob at Anne's House of
Dreams.

Gerald Durrell.

Watership Down.

Now I'm getting the urge to step away from the computer and read so
I'll leave UKRM to add to the list. They are the same as a plate of
comfort food.
--
Lady Nina
Ichi-go, Ichi-e
Vass
2007-12-12 09:03:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lady Nina
Now I'm getting the urge to step away from the computer and read so
I'll leave UKRM to add to the list. They are the same as a plate of
comfort food.
Jeremy still reads "how things work"
--
Vass
CT
2007-12-12 09:21:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lady Nina
What I have kept and go back to;
[snip]

Strangely, although I like keeping books, subject to having suitable
space, I very rarely go back and read them. Fiction, anyway.
--
Chris
The Older Gentleman
2007-12-12 09:22:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lady Nina
A wrinkle in Time, probably the first sci-fi I read.
<AOL> on both counts. Did you she she (the author) died just recently?

I won my copy as a school prize in 1966.

I read and re-read Gerald Durrell, too.

George MacDonald means nothing to me. I thought you meant George
MacDonald Fraser, author of the Flashman books. I first read Flashman
when I was about 11 or 12, I suppose, and since then have religiously
bought every Flashman book as it came out. Plus the MacAuslan books, and
some of his other stuff.

He was on Desert Island Discs a few years ago. Wonderful. The Doctor
says her history teacher at school used to encourage her pupils to read
the Flashman books, because they were *so* historically accurate.
--
BMW K1100LT 750SS CB400F CD250 CB125 SL125
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Lady Nina
2007-12-12 09:34:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by Lady Nina
A wrinkle in Time, probably the first sci-fi I read.
<AOL> on both counts. Did you she she (the author) died just recently?
I did and was surprised as I thought she was dead years ago.
Post by The Older Gentleman
I won my copy as a school prize in 1966.
Oh sub thread, books won as school prizes. City of London Freeman's
School General Knowledge prize in 1980/1, the Octopus big book of
nature. I've kept it for the book plate. I still love the fact the
tiny 3rd year girl that I was beat the entire lower school.
Post by The Older Gentleman
I read and re-read Gerald Durrell, too.
I've got the Buster Taylor vet books as well, though I haven't read
those for knocking on a decade, must remedy that. I remember being sad
and annoyed at the stupidity of peoplewho abandoned or killed
dacshunds in the second world war
Post by The Older Gentleman
George MacDonald means nothing to me.
Inspiration for Lewis, d'Engle, Auden, Chesterton, Carroll amongst
others. Worth a read of the adult stuff, the children's stories have
since been done better.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_MacDonald
Post by The Older Gentleman
I thought you meant George
MacDonald Fraser, author of the Flashman books. I first read Flashman
when I was about 11 or 12, I suppose, and since then have religiously
bought every Flashman book as it came out. Plus the MacAuslan books, and
some of his other stuff.
Read some of the Flashman, I think they were too 'real' iyswim for me
then.
Post by The Older Gentleman
He was on Desert Island Discs a few years ago. Wonderful. The Doctor
says her history teacher at school used to encourage her pupils to read
the Flashman books, because they were *so* historically accurate.
Heh.
--
Lady Nina
It is with coffee alone I set my mind in motion
The Older Gentleman
2007-12-12 09:46:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lady Nina
d'Engle
l'Engle
--
BMW K1100LT 750SS CB400F CD250 CB125 SL125
GAGARPHOF#30 GHPOTHUF#1 BOTAFOT#60 ANORAK#06 YTC#3
BOF#30 WUSS#5 The bells, the bells.....
chateau dot murray at idnet dot com
Donald
2007-12-12 11:40:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by Lady Nina
A wrinkle in Time, probably the first sci-fi I read.
<AOL> on both counts. Did you she she (the author) died just recently?
I won my copy as a school prize in 1966.
For some strange reason I though you were much younger than that.
You don't appear to have aged much over the last 10 years.

snip
--
Donald
Champ
2007-12-12 14:48:25 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 12 Dec 2007 11:40:12 +0000, Donald
Post by Donald
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by Lady Nina
A wrinkle in Time, probably the first sci-fi I read.
<AOL> on both counts. Did you she she (the author) died just recently?
I won my copy as a school prize in 1966.
For some strange reason I though you were much younger than that.
You don't appear to have aged much over the last 10 years.
Yeah, but he looked old to start with.
--
Champ
I don't know, but I been told, you never slow down, you never get old
ZX10R | GPz750turbo | GSX-R600 (race)
neal at champ dot org dot uk
Cane
2007-12-12 14:59:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Champ
Post by Donald
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by Lady Nina
A wrinkle in Time, probably the first sci-fi I read.
<AOL> on both counts. Did you she she (the author) died just recently?
I won my copy as a school prize in 1966.
For some strange reason I though you were much younger than that.
You don't appear to have aged much over the last 10 years.
Yeah, but he looked old to start with.
...like James May's less successful, older brother.
The Older Gentleman
2007-12-12 17:20:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cane
Post by Champ
Post by Donald
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by Lady Nina
A wrinkle in Time, probably the first sci-fi I read.
<AOL> on both counts. Did you she she (the author) died just recently?
I won my copy as a school prize in 1966.
For some strange reason I though you were much younger than that.
You don't appear to have aged much over the last 10 years.
Yeah, but he looked old to start with.
...like James May's less successful, older brother.
More cultured, better looking....
--
BMW K1100LT 750SS CB400F CD250 CB125 SL125
GAGARPHOF#30 GHPOTHUF#1 BOTAFOT#60 ANORAK#06 YTC#3
BOF#30 WUSS#5 The bells, the bells.....
chateau dot murray at idnet dot com
Champ
2007-12-12 17:37:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by Cane
Post by Champ
Post by Donald
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by Lady Nina
A wrinkle in Time, probably the first sci-fi I read.
<AOL> on both counts. Did you she she (the author) died just recently?
I won my copy as a school prize in 1966.
For some strange reason I though you were much younger than that.
You don't appear to have aged much over the last 10 years.
Yeah, but he looked old to start with.
...like James May's less successful, older brother.
More cultured, better looking....
Poorer...
--
Champ
I don't know, but I been told, you never slow down, you never get old
ZX10R | GPz750turbo | GSX-R600 (race)
neal at champ dot org dot uk
The Older Gentleman
2007-12-12 17:51:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Champ
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by Cane
Post by Champ
Post by Donald
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by Lady Nina
A wrinkle in Time, probably the first sci-fi I read.
<AOL> on both counts. Did you she she (the author) died just recently?
I won my copy as a school prize in 1966.
For some strange reason I though you were much younger than that.
You don't appear to have aged much over the last 10 years.
Yeah, but he looked old to start with.
...like James May's less successful, older brother.
More cultured, better looking....
Poorer...
Oh yes :-(
--
BMW K1100LT 750SS CB400F CD250 CB125 SL125
GAGARPHOF#30 GHPOTHUF#1 BOTAFOT#60 ANORAK#06 YTC#3
BOF#30 WUSS#5 The bells, the bells.....
chateau dot murray at idnet dot com
Cane
2007-12-13 12:56:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by Champ
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by Cane
Post by Champ
Post by Donald
For some strange reason I though you were much younger than that.
You don't appear to have aged much over the last 10 years.
Yeah, but he looked old to start with.
...like James May's less successful, older brother.
More cultured, better looking....
Poorer...
Oh yes :-(
I told you to put the Doc on the game, there's a growing, untapped
DILF market out there.
Ace
2007-12-12 15:12:56 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 12 Dec 2007 11:40:12 +0000, Donald
Post by Donald
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by Lady Nina
A wrinkle in Time, probably the first sci-fi I read.
<AOL> on both counts. Did you she she (the author) died just recently?
I won my copy as a school prize in 1966.
For some strange reason I though you were much younger than that.
You don't appear to have aged much over the last 10 years.
Once you get past a certain point it's difficult to look any older.
--
_______
.'_/_|_\_'. Ace (bdotrogers a.t compaqnet.fr)
\`\ | /`/ DS#8 BOTAFOT#3 SbS#2 UKRMMA#13 DFV#8 SKA#2 IBB#10
`\\ | //'
`\|/`
`
Simian
2007-12-12 22:57:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by Lady Nina
A wrinkle in Time, probably the first sci-fi I read.
<AOL> on both counts. Did you she she (the author) died just recently?
I won my copy as a school prize in 1966.
Hah! Me too, but in 1982...
Nige
2007-12-12 09:26:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lady Nina
Following a comment by Simian that it had been over 28 years since he
read the hobbit I was thinking that it must be about the same and
thinking about my early reading. I vaguely remember the Janet and John
books. I know by the time we were living in Oxford (so I was 6/7) I'd
got to the end of the Primary school reading scheme. Then I started to
eat up the real books.
Lots of the worthy stuff Harriet Beecher Stowe, CS Lewis, George
MacDonald.
Classics like Treasure Island, Huckleberry Finn, White Fang.
I was going to say I've kept none of the above but I have a folio
edition of the Narnia books somewhere and a slip case of George
MacDonald. I don't read them though.
What I have kept and go back to;
A wrinkle in Time, probably the first sci-fi I read.
The entire Anne of Green Gables series. I still sob at Anne's House of
Dreams.
Gerald Durrell.
Watership Down.
The Machine Gunners
Lady Nina
2007-12-12 09:41:08 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 12 Dec 2007 09:26:27 -0000, "Nige"
<***@btinternet.com> wrote:

SNIP

Re reading books
Post by Nige
The Machine Gunners
Oh I read that, I thought it was by Ian Serraillier, but a quick
google shows it isn't. I had all of his though, they've disappered
over the years.

There was another couple I've remembered that are war related [1] 'I
am David' and one about the evacuation from Dunkirk, were a boy takes
his small boat across, can't recall the name of that one now.

Right, time to head up North.

[1] I suppose it's hardly a surprise that books we were reading in the
70s were heavily influenced by the experiences of the authors.
--
Lady Nina
It is with coffee alone I set my mind in motion
The Older Gentleman
2007-12-12 09:46:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lady Nina
Ian Serraillier
God, another author I'd forgotten. I loved The Silver Sword.

And Ronald Welch, for kids' historical novels, too.
--
BMW K1100LT 750SS CB400F CD250 CB125 SL125
GAGARPHOF#30 GHPOTHUF#1 BOTAFOT#60 ANORAK#06 YTC#3
BOF#30 WUSS#5 The bells, the bells.....
chateau dot murray at idnet dot com
Nige
2007-12-12 10:06:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lady Nina
On Wed, 12 Dec 2007 09:26:27 -0000, "Nige"
SNIP
Re reading books
Post by Nige
The Machine Gunners
Oh I read that, I thought it was by Ian Serraillier, but a quick
google shows it isn't. I had all of his though, they've disappered
over the years.
Robert Westall & the follow up was called Fathom Five.
w***@lardrover.co.uk
2007-12-12 17:17:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lady Nina
and one about the evacuation from Dunkirk, were a boy takes
his small boat across, can't recall the name of that one now.
That wasn't the Snow Goose was it, made into a film with Jenny
Agutter? *

* also in Walkabout, yes I know it was only a brief shot of her in the
buff but it was enough :) One of the films I recall as a kid, that and
Silent Running.

All the best
--
Wayne Davies, Harrogate 07989 556213

A Land Rover on the road is worth two in the Shed
The Older Gentleman
2007-12-12 17:27:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by w***@lardrover.co.uk
That wasn't the Snow Goose was it, made into a film with Jenny
Agutter? *
That was a Paul Gallico story. I liked his books, as well.

Especially The Silent Miaow, an owner's guide to humans, as written by a
cat.
--
BMW K1100LT 750SS CB400F CD250 CB125 SL125
GAGARPHOF#30 GHPOTHUF#1 BOTAFOT#60 ANORAK#06 YTC#3
BOF#30 WUSS#5 The bells, the bells.....
chateau dot murray at idnet dot com
Philip Powell
2007-12-13 17:25:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by w***@lardrover.co.uk
Post by Lady Nina
and one about the evacuation from Dunkirk, were a boy takes
his small boat across, can't recall the name of that one now.
That wasn't the Snow Goose was it, made into a film with Jenny
Agutter? *
* also in Walkabout, yes I know it was only a brief shot of her in the
buff but it was enough :) One of the films I recall as a kid, that and
Silent Running.
In The Snow Goose, it was a man [played in the film by Richard Harris]
who sailed his boat over rather than a young boy.

Jenny - wow!

Being webmaster of her official website, I am allowed to be a bit
biased.
--
Philip Powell
Looking north across the Derwent Valley and Northumberland
to The Cheviot
Lady Nina
2007-12-13 23:53:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by w***@lardrover.co.uk
Post by Lady Nina
and one about the evacuation from Dunkirk, were a boy takes
his small boat across, can't recall the name of that one now.
That wasn't the Snow Goose was it, made into a film with Jenny
Agutter? *
No, that's Paul Gallico - must read the man who was magic and jennie
again which are the only ones I kept - may have to recreate that
collection.

It's bugging me. Searching gives this

http://www.wartimememories.co.uk/childrensbooks.html

which reminded me of the Nina Bawden ones.

The one that fits the description most is the little ships, but not
convinced it was that one.
Post by w***@lardrover.co.uk
* also in Walkabout, yes I know it was only a brief shot of her in the
buff but it was enough :)
Oh yes.
Post by w***@lardrover.co.uk
One of the films I recall as a kid, that and
Silent Running.
<passes tissues to Snowy>
--
Lady Nina
just a flicker and then a breeze
darsy
2007-12-12 09:40:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lady Nina
Following a comment by Simian that it had been over 28 years since he
read the hobbit I was thinking that it must be about the same and
thinking about my early reading.
I got rid of all my fiction 10 years ago when I moved to London.
Something like a thousand paperbacks.

--
d.
Phil Launchbury
2007-12-12 09:38:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lady Nina
Gerald Durrell.
Watership Down.
Shardik - by the guy that wrote Watership down (but more
fantasy-based and a lot more bloody).

Other than that I don't really re-read stuff I read as a youngster.
Most of it was tripe (EE Doc Smith springs to mind!).

Phil
--
Phil Launchbury, IT PHB
'I'm training the bats that live in my cube
to juggle mushrooms'
platypus
2007-12-12 11:17:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Phil Launchbury
Post by Lady Nina
Gerald Durrell.
Watership Down.
Shardik - by the guy that wrote Watership down (but more
fantasy-based and a lot more bloody).
Other than that I don't really re-read stuff I read as a youngster.
Most of it was tripe (EE Doc Smith springs to mind!).
<guilty glance at shelf of Lensman, Skylark etc>

At least I've got rid of all the John Norman rubbish. Err, almost all...
Phil Launchbury
2007-12-12 11:44:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by platypus
Post by Phil Launchbury
Other than that I don't really re-read stuff I read as a youngster.
Most of it was tripe (EE Doc Smith springs to mind!).
<guilty glance at shelf of Lensman, Skylark etc>
I tried re-reading the Lensman books a couple of years ago (with my
nostalgia specs on) and got bored after about 20 pages. The rampant
racism and sexism didn't help either..
Post by platypus
At least I've got rid of all the John Norman rubbish. Err, almost all...
I went through a phase in my teenage year of avidly reading the Gor
books. Needless to say I made sure that my parents didn't read them. Or
see the covers..

Phil.
--
Phil Launchbury, IT PHB
'I'm training the bats that live in my cube
to juggle mushrooms'
ogden
2007-12-12 11:54:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Phil Launchbury
I went through a phase in my teenage year of avidly reading the Gor
books. Needless to say I made sure that my parents didn't read them. Or
see the covers..
That name rings a bell...

Ah, yeah, the dodgy mysogynistic stuff. I knew I'd heard about it
somewhere.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/4996410.stm
--
ogden
sv650 & rgv250
platypus
2007-12-12 12:03:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by ogden
Post by Phil Launchbury
I went through a phase in my teenage year of avidly reading the Gor
books. Needless to say I made sure that my parents didn't read them.
Or see the covers..
That name rings a bell...
Ah, yeah, the dodgy mysogynistic stuff. I knew I'd heard about it
somewhere.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/4996410.stm
I may just have a quick re-read...
Des
2007-12-12 10:11:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lady Nina
Following a comment by Simian that it had been over 28 years since he
read the hobbit I was thinking that it must be about the same and
thinking about my early reading. I vaguely remember the Janet and John
books. I know by the time we were living in Oxford (so I was 6/7) I'd
got to the end of the Primary school reading scheme. Then I started to
eat up the real books.
Lots of the worthy stuff Harriet Beecher Stowe, CS Lewis, George
MacDonald.
Classics like Treasure Island, Huckleberry Finn, White Fang.
I was going to say I've kept none of the above but I have a folio
edition of the Narnia books somewhere and a slip case of George
MacDonald. I don't read them though.
What I have kept and go back to;
A wrinkle in Time, probably the first sci-fi I read.
The entire Anne of Green Gables series. I still sob at Anne's House of
Dreams.
Gerald Durrell.
Watership Down.
Now I'm getting the urge to step away from the computer and read so
I'll leave UKRM to add to the list. They are the same as a plate of
comfort food.
Every 'Famous Five' book, Dr Who and 'The Secret Seven'. Then _Watership_
_Down_, _The Hobbit_ and _The Lord of the Rings_. CS Lewis, Ray Bradbury.
I discovered Shakespeare at say, twelve and have loved it ever since. We
might in fact be getting approval to stage a full version of 'Hamlet' at
the school.

D.
--
des
French Biking Vocabulary: http://minilien.fr/a0kg0p

'Kaiser: "Can you prove to me the existence of G-d?"
Bismarck: "The Jews, your Majesty. The Jews"'
antonye
2007-12-12 10:30:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lady Nina
Now I'm getting the urge to step away from the computer and read so
I'll leave UKRM to add to the list. They are the same as a plate of
comfort food.
Not really kept anything from my early youth but I still have
a lot of the paperbacks I read when I was in my teens; everything
by Clive Barker and Shaun Hutson which probably explains a lot
about me. Most of the books I read now are autobiographies.

My eldest is now starting to read herself, so she gets a lot
of the "Chip & Biff" books to read with some other random ones
mixed in, as does the youngest. The youngest prefers the
"Topsy and Tim" series though.

I think they've got a few years to go before I let them loose
on my paperback collection (which is boxed up in the garage
anyway) and with them both being girls I doubt it will interest
them in the slightest anyway.

--
Antony
ogden
2007-12-12 11:07:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by antonye
Post by Lady Nina
Now I'm getting the urge to step away from the computer and read so
I'll leave UKRM to add to the list. They are the same as a plate of
comfort food.
Not really kept anything from my early youth but I still have
a lot of the paperbacks I read when I was in my teens; everything
by Clive Barker and Shaun Hutson which probably explains a lot
about me.
One of the few books I still have from before my 20s, other than a very
dog-eared copy of The Witches that I haven't read in donkeys years, is
Relics by Shaun Hutson. I kept it because he's one of the worst writers
I've ever come across. Worse than Lovecraft. Possibly even worse than
Rowling. It's so bad it's borderline genius.

Two words: Garth Marenghi.
--
ogden
sv650 & rgv250
antonye
2007-12-12 11:10:18 UTC
Permalink
[of Shaun Hutson]
It's so bad it's borderline genius.
Yes, the Barbara Cartland of the horror world.

--
Antony
vulgarandmischevious
2007-12-12 12:41:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by antonye
My eldest is now starting to read herself
I bet that's a bastard for the wife to wash off.
--
vulgarandmischevious
Lady Nina
2007-12-14 00:08:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by antonye
Post by Lady Nina
Now I'm getting the urge to step away from the computer and read so
I'll leave UKRM to add to the list. They are the same as a plate of
comfort food.
Not really kept anything from my early youth but I still have
a lot of the paperbacks I read when I was in my teens; everything
by Clive Barker and Shaun Hutson which probably explains a lot
about me. Most of the books I read now are autobiographies.
Shaun Hutson is *awful*. I've still got a couple of Clive Barker books
though. Then I went onto Brian Lumley but that was very late teens if
not early twenties.
Post by antonye
My eldest is now starting to read herself, so she gets a lot
of the "Chip & Biff" books to read with some other random ones
mixed in, as does the youngest. The youngest prefers the
"Topsy and Tim" series though.
We had a couple of Topsy and Tim books, the Chip & Biff must be after
my two were at that stage. It's weird when they go off and read on
their own, in one way I'm quite looking forward to grandchildren as I
can dig out all the books I've stashed from when they were small.

There's a couple of Mick Inkpen books that I (and they) can still say
from memory. If you say 'don't sniff, blow your nose' in this house
you get a chorus of 'it's not quite right it's impolite to fiddle with
your toes'

That's from 'Don't do that'. Then there's the little spotty thing.

The purple thing was horrible,
its nasty friend was blue
They found a little spotty thing
and tore his hat in two

a shadow fell upon them
they said ''here, who are you?'
I'm the thing, that little things
with spots grow up into.

Anyway, shutting up now.

So I do books now and then, I can handle it...
Post by antonye
I think they've got a few years to go before I let them loose
on my paperback collection (which is boxed up in the garage
anyway) and with them both being girls I doubt it will interest
them in the slightest anyway.
Girls read crappy horror as well! Though Rachel read all of Roald Dahl
(they got passed onto Tallbloke's nephew iirc) then went onto
Jacqueline Wilson who is too much into desperate social realism for my
tastes. Plus she spwawned the hell that is Tracey Beaker.
--
Lady Nina
just a flicker and then a breeze
Cane
2007-12-12 11:04:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lady Nina
Following a comment by Simian that it had been over 28 years since he
read the hobbit I was thinking that it must be about the same and
thinking about my early reading. I vaguely remember the Janet and John
books. I know by the time we were living in Oxford (so I was 6/7) I'd
got to the end of the Primary school reading scheme. Then I started to
eat up the real books.
Direct Connection's Internet Introduced by Darren Irvine is still
quite funny.
darsy
2007-12-12 11:15:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cane
Post by Lady Nina
Following a comment by Simian that it had been over 28 years since he
read the hobbit I was thinking that it must be about the same and
thinking about my early reading. I vaguely remember the Janet and John
books. I know by the time we were living in Oxford (so I was 6/7) I'd
got to the end of the Primary school reading scheme. Then I started to
eat up the real books.
Direct Connection's Internet Introduced by Darren Irvine is still
quite funny.
"UK Comms" was much funnier. No wait, not funnier, just longer.

--
d.
darsy
2007-12-12 11:17:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by darsy
Post by Cane
Post by Lady Nina
Following a comment by Simian that it had been over 28 years since he
read the hobbit I was thinking that it must be about the same and
thinking about my early reading. I vaguely remember the Janet and John
books. I know by the time we were living in Oxford (so I was 6/7) I'd
got to the end of the Primary school reading scheme. Then I started to
eat up the real books.
Direct Connection's Internet Introduced by Darren Irvine is still
quite funny.
"UK Comms" was much funnier. No wait, not funnier, just longer.
and which, staggeringly, is available (albeit 2nd hand) via Amazon.

--
d.
Cane
2007-12-12 11:20:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by darsy
Post by darsy
Post by Cane
Direct Connection's Internet Introduced by Darren Irvine is still
quite funny.
"UK Comms" was much funnier. No wait, not funnier, just longer.
and which, staggeringly, is available (albeit 2nd hand) via Amazon.
Will you sign mine?
darsy
2007-12-12 11:24:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cane
Post by darsy
Post by darsy
Post by Cane
Direct Connection's Internet Introduced by Darren Irvine is still
quite funny.
"UK Comms" was much funnier. No wait, not funnier, just longer.
and which, staggeringly, is available (albeit 2nd hand) via Amazon.
Will you sign mine?
sign your what?

--
d.
Charlie
2007-12-12 11:12:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lady Nina
Following a comment by Simian that it had been over 28 years since he
read the hobbit I was thinking that it must be about the same and
thinking about my early reading. I vaguely remember the Janet and John
books. I know by the time we were living in Oxford (so I was 6/7) I'd
got to the end of the Primary school reading scheme. Then I started to
eat up the real books.
I still read - both end to end and just to dip into for a chapter or so -
The Ascent of Rum Doodle by W. E. Bowman.
Colin Irvine
2007-12-12 11:24:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lady Nina
Following a comment by Simian that it had been over 28 years since he
read the hobbit I was thinking that it must be about the same and
thinking about my early reading.
My most avid reading as a small boy was GA Henty. I still have a few
of his books for their curiosity value. I don't read any of my
childhood books nowadays to myself, but I find some of them are a real
pleasure to read to grandchildren - Kenneth Grahame and AA Milne in
particular.
--
Colin Irvine
YZF1000R BOF#33 BONY#34 COFF#06 BHaLC#5
http://www.colinandpat.co.uk
Eiron
2007-12-12 12:03:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Colin Irvine
Post by Lady Nina
Following a comment by Simian that it had been over 28 years since he
read the hobbit I was thinking that it must be about the same and
thinking about my early reading.
My most avid reading as a small boy was GA Henty. I still have a few
of his books for their curiosity value. I don't read any of my
childhood books nowadays to myself, but I find some of them are a real
pleasure to read to grandchildren - Kenneth Grahame and AA Milne in
particular.
A.A. Milne, the political satirist. 'Churchill The Shit' is still popular
even though the publisher insisted on a title change to avoid an
action for libel. :-)
--
Eiron.
Colin Irvine
2007-12-12 12:46:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eiron
Post by Colin Irvine
Post by Lady Nina
Following a comment by Simian that it had been over 28 years since he
read the hobbit I was thinking that it must be about the same and
thinking about my early reading.
My most avid reading as a small boy was GA Henty. I still have a few
of his books for their curiosity value. I don't read any of my
childhood books nowadays to myself, but I find some of them are a real
pleasure to read to grandchildren - Kenneth Grahame and AA Milne in
particular.
A.A. Milne, the political satirist. 'Churchill The Shit' is still popular
even though the publisher insisted on a title change to avoid an
action for libel. :-)
?
--
Colin Irvine
YZF1000R BOF#33 BONY#34 COFF#06 BHaLC#5
http://www.colinandpat.co.uk
ogden
2007-12-12 13:17:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eiron
A.A. Milne, the political satirist. 'Churchill The Shit' is still popular
even though the publisher insisted on a title change to avoid an
action for libel. :-)
?
"Winnie The Pooh"

I *think* he was trying to do a funny, but it's hard to tell.
--
ogden
sv650 & rgv250
Colin Irvine
2007-12-12 13:46:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by ogden
Post by Eiron
A.A. Milne, the political satirist. 'Churchill The Shit' is still popular
even though the publisher insisted on a title change to avoid an
action for libel. :-)
?
"Winnie The Pooh"
Ah. Thank you. I had surmised Eiron might have been alluding to one of
AAM's many contributions to Punch. I should have known better.
--
Colin Irvine
YZF1000R BOF#33 BONY#34 COFF#06 BHaLC#5
http://www.colinandpat.co.uk
p***@ps-fisher.demon.co.uk
2007-12-12 13:49:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Colin Irvine
Post by Lady Nina
Following a comment by Simian that it had been over 28 years since he
read the hobbit I was thinking that it must be about the same and
thinking about my early reading.
My most avid reading as a small boy was GA Henty. I still have a few
of his books for their curiosity value. I don't read any of my
childhood books nowadays to myself, but I find some of them are a real
pleasure to read to grandchildren - Kenneth Grahame and AA Milne in
particular.
I still have the copy of "The Wind in the Willows" that my grandmother
gave me, and SWMBO still has all her Milne titles ("When we were very
young" being a favourite). Hope to get the lad reading them, but he is
more in to "Blood Fever" etc.

PF
The Older Gentleman
2007-12-12 17:27:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by p***@ps-fisher.demon.co.uk
I still have the copy of "The Wind in the Willows" that my grandmother
gave me
I *still* read that from time to time.

Oh, and I still dip into Kipling. Frequently.
--
BMW K1100LT 750SS CB400F CD250 CB125 SL125
GAGARPHOF#30 GHPOTHUF#1 BOTAFOT#60 ANORAK#06 YTC#3
BOF#30 WUSS#5 The bells, the bells.....
chateau dot murray at idnet dot com
Champ
2007-12-12 17:38:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by p***@ps-fisher.demon.co.uk
I still have the copy of "The Wind in the Willows" that my grandmother
gave me
I *still* read that from time to time.
Oh, and I still dip into Kipling. Frequently.
"Do you like Kipling?"
--
Champ
I don't know, but I been told, you never slow down, you never get old
ZX10R | GPz750turbo | GSX-R600 (race)
neal at champ dot org dot uk
Wicked Uncle Nigel
2007-12-12 17:48:04 UTC
Permalink
Using the patented Mavis Beacon "Hunt&Peck" Technique, Champ
Post by Champ
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by p***@ps-fisher.demon.co.uk
I still have the copy of "The Wind in the Willows" that my grandmother
gave me
I *still* read that from time to time.
Oh, and I still dip into Kipling. Frequently.
"Do you like Kipling?"
"I don't know, I've never..."

I hate these threads. I've just dredged up "The Beastly Beatitudes of
Balthazar B" from deep-memory, and now I've had to go off to Abebooks to
order a copy.
--
Wicked Uncle Nigel - "He's hopeless, but he's honest"

WS* GHPOTHUF#24 APOSTLE#14 DLC#1 COFF#20 BOTAFOT#150 HYPO#0(KoTL) IbW#41
SBS#39 OMF#6 Enfield 500 Curry House Racer "The Basmati Rice Burner",
Honda GL1000K2 (Fallen apart) Suzuki TS250 "The Africa Single"
Norton 850 Commando Kawasaki GTR1400
Champ
2007-12-12 19:30:17 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 12 Dec 2007 17:48:04 +0000, Wicked Uncle Nigel
Post by Wicked Uncle Nigel
Post by Champ
Post by The Older Gentleman
Oh, and I still dip into Kipling. Frequently.
"Do you like Kipling?"
"I don't know, I've never..."
"Do you like Dickens?"
--
Champ

ZX10R | GPz750turbo | GSX-R 600 racer
My advice as your attorney is to buy a motorcycle
To email me, neal at my domain should work.
Lady Nina
2007-12-14 00:21:07 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 12 Dec 2007 17:48:04 +0000, Wicked Uncle Nigel
Post by Wicked Uncle Nigel
I hate these threads. I've just dredged up "The Beastly Beatitudes of
Balthazar B" from deep-memory, and now I've had to go off to Abebooks to
order a copy.
MWHID.
--
Lady Nina
just a flicker and then a breeze
Grimly Curmudgeon
2007-12-12 18:14:28 UTC
Permalink
We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the
Post by The Older Gentleman
Oh, and I still dip into Kipling. Frequently.
Not surprising, with the small cakes they sell.
--
Dave
GS850x2 XS650 SE6a

With their British Home Stores eyes
Pete Fisher
2007-12-12 19:17:40 UTC
Permalink
In communiqué <1i90r1o.jbz76e1w84ghpN%***@yahoo.co.uk>,
The Older Gentleman <***@yahoo.co.uk> cast forth these
pearls of wisdom
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by p***@ps-fisher.demon.co.uk
I still have the copy of "The Wind in the Willows" that my grandmother
gave me
I *still* read that from time to time.
I will admit that the passage describing Mole opening up his old home
again at Christmas time can still bring a tear to my eye.
--
+-------------------------------------------------------------+
| Pete Fisher at Home: ***@ps-fisher.demon.co.uk |
| Voxan Roadster Gilera Nordwest Yamaha WR250Z |
| Gilera GFR * 2 Moto Morini 2C/375 |
+-------------------------------------------------------------+
The Older Gentleman
2007-12-12 19:46:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pete Fisher
pearls of wisdom
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by p***@ps-fisher.demon.co.uk
I still have the copy of "The Wind in the Willows" that my grandmother
gave me
I *still* read that from time to time.
I will admit that the passage describing Mole opening up his old home
again at Christmas time can still bring a tear to my eye.
Nah, it's the bit after that, when the carol-singers happen by.
--
BMW K1100LT 750SS CB400F CD250 CB125 SL125
GAGARPHOF#30 GHPOTHUF#1 BOTAFOT#60 ANORAK#06 YTC#3
BOF#30 WUSS#5 The bells, the bells.....
chateau dot murray at idnet dot com
Lady Nina
2007-12-14 00:19:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by p***@ps-fisher.demon.co.uk
I still have the copy of "The Wind in the Willows" that my grandmother
gave me, and SWMBO still has all her Milne titles ("When we were very
young" being a favourite). Hope to get the lad reading them, but he is
more in to "Blood Fever" etc.
Oh add Ian Fleming to the list. I had what I now know (from looking at
the battered remains) were first editions of four of the Bond books,
dug out of the store cupboard where the books of residents who died
were put. When I'd read everything and was clamouring for something
else I'd be told in exasperated tones 'go look in the cupboard'.
Which is where I also read Hunter S Thompson's book on the Hells
Angels at a far too young age.

I never managed to get either of my two to read the Milne stuff, it
just didn't click with them.
--
Lady Nina
just a flicker and then a breeze
Boots
2007-12-12 11:49:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lady Nina
Following a comment by Simian that it had been over 28 years since he
read the hobbit I was thinking that it must be about the same and
thinking about my early reading.
SNIP
Post by Lady Nina
Now I'm getting the urge to step away from the computer and read so
I'll leave UKRM to add to the list. They are the same as a plate of
comfort food.
I throw out very few books even if they don't get read again / often.
I think the first I bought myself were the twelve Dr Dolittle books
that puffin re-published sometime in the late '60s and they're still
on a shelf at home.

--
Ian
no idea man
2007-12-12 12:49:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lady Nina
Following a comment by Simian that it had been over 28 years since he
read the hobbit I was thinking that it must be about the same and
thinking about my early reading. I vaguely remember the Janet and John
books. I know by the time we were living in Oxford (so I was 6/7) I'd
got to the end of the Primary school reading scheme. Then I started to
eat up the real books.
Now I'm getting the urge to step away from the computer and read so
I'll leave UKRM to add to the list. They are the same as a plate of
comfort food.
Early primary, wasn't interested in books, Dr Seuss if anything (Green
Eggs and Ham was the favourite but haven't seen it for years).

Later primary I became fascinated by factual books - all the Ladybird
history stuff (although I still don't know who "Warwick the Kingmaker"
was). Also loved the Guiness Book of Records. Now my little boy (6)
has one and we both read it.

Into comprehensive and I went through a John Wyndham phase. At some
point I got as far as "The Kraken Wakes" and just lost interest half
way through. Later still got into poetry anthologies and The Rubaiyat
- lent them to my MiL some years ago and she chucked them.

Probably the only books that I still have from childhood/youth are
"Here Comes Mumfie" (Tozer?) which my kids love(d), Mary Plain (Rae)
which my kids really CBA with and The Little Prince (AdSE) which
remains one of my favourite books of all time.
The Older Gentleman
2007-12-12 17:27:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by no idea man
Into comprehensive and I went through a John Wyndham phase.
I still think he was incredibly under-rated as a writer. The Day of the
Triffids is his most famous book, but for a real frightener, try reading
Web.
--
BMW K1100LT 750SS CB400F CD250 CB125 SL125
GAGARPHOF#30 GHPOTHUF#1 BOTAFOT#60 ANORAK#06 YTC#3
BOF#30 WUSS#5 The bells, the bells.....
chateau dot murray at idnet dot com
dog
2007-12-12 14:03:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lady Nina
I was going to say I've kept none of the above but I have a folio
edition of the Narnia books somewhere and a slip case of George
MacDonald. I don't read them though.
1066 and all that
the adventures of uncle lubin (admittedly not really for the story)
20,000 leagues under the sea (just because it's a first edition and a lovely
object)
--
dog
sl1000 two#5 pwcram#3
Phil Launchbury
2007-12-12 14:29:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by dog
Post by Lady Nina
I was going to say I've kept none of the above but I have a folio
edition of the Narnia books somewhere and a slip case of George
MacDonald. I don't read them though.
1066 and all that
Great book. My nephew has inherited my copy.

Phil
--
Phil Launchbury, IT PHB
'I'm training the bats that live in my cube
to juggle mushrooms'
Colin Irvine
2007-12-12 15:07:28 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 12 Dec 2007 14:29:28 +0000, Phil Launchbury
Post by Phil Launchbury
Post by dog
Post by Lady Nina
I was going to say I've kept none of the above but I have a folio
edition of the Narnia books somewhere and a slip case of George
MacDonald. I don't read them though.
1066 and all that
Great book. My nephew has inherited my copy.
Phil
Great book indeed. I even quoted from it in the recent EDZ thermals
thread.
--
Colin Irvine
YZF1000R BOF#33 BONY#34 COFF#06 BHaLC#5
http://www.colinandpat.co.uk
The Older Gentleman
2007-12-12 17:27:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Colin Irvine
On Wed, 12 Dec 2007 14:29:28 +0000, Phil Launchbury
Post by Phil Launchbury
Post by dog
Post by Lady Nina
I was going to say I've kept none of the above but I have a folio
edition of the Narnia books somewhere and a slip case of George
MacDonald. I don't read them though.
1066 and all that
Great book. My nephew has inherited my copy.
Phil
Great book indeed. I even quoted from it in the recent EDZ thermals
thread.
I'm surprised nobody has mentioned the Molesworth books yet.
--
BMW K1100LT 750SS CB400F CD250 CB125 SL125
GAGARPHOF#30 GHPOTHUF#1 BOTAFOT#60 ANORAK#06 YTC#3
BOF#30 WUSS#5 The bells, the bells.....
chateau dot murray at idnet dot com
Charlie
2007-12-12 17:43:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by Colin Irvine
On Wed, 12 Dec 2007 14:29:28 +0000, Phil Launchbury
Post by Phil Launchbury
Post by dog
Post by Lady Nina
I was going to say I've kept none of the above but I have a folio
edition of the Narnia books somewhere and a slip case of George
MacDonald. I don't read them though.
1066 and all that
Great book. My nephew has inherited my copy.
Phil
Great book indeed. I even quoted from it in the recent EDZ thermals
thread.
I'm surprised nobody has mentioned the Molesworth books yet.
Heh. I found a copy of How to be Topp a few months ago in a secondhand book
shop, and gave it to my boys. Much appreciated.
ogden
2007-12-12 19:06:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Older Gentleman
I'm surprised nobody has mentioned the Molesworth books yet.
They don't exactly bear up to re-reading now though, do they? To say
they were painfully dated would be an understatement.
--
ogden
sv650 & rgv250
The Older Gentleman
2007-12-12 19:46:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by ogden
Post by The Older Gentleman
I'm surprised nobody has mentioned the Molesworth books yet.
They don't exactly bear up to re-reading now though, do they? To say
they were painfully dated would be an understatement.
Unfortunately, that's probably true.
--
BMW K1100LT 750SS CB400F CD250 CB125 SL125
GAGARPHOF#30 GHPOTHUF#1 BOTAFOT#60 ANORAK#06 YTC#3
BOF#30 WUSS#5 The bells, the bells.....
chateau dot murray at idnet dot com
Pete Fisher
2007-12-12 19:20:49 UTC
Permalink
In communiqué <1i90r43.75vpqf1dl6pjjN%***@yahoo.co.uk>,
The Older Gentleman <***@yahoo.co.uk> cast forth these
pearls of wisdom
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by Colin Irvine
On Wed, 12 Dec 2007 14:29:28 +0000, Phil Launchbury
Post by Phil Launchbury
Post by dog
Post by Lady Nina
I was going to say I've kept none of the above but I have a folio
edition of the Narnia books somewhere and a slip case of George
MacDonald. I don't read them though.
1066 and all that
Great book. My nephew has inherited my copy.
Phil
Great book indeed. I even quoted from it in the recent EDZ thermals
thread.
I'm surprised nobody has mentioned the Molesworth books yet.
<pats copy of "The Complete Molesworth". Also "The Tao of Pooh and the
Te of Piglet" (not kid's books at all though)>
--
+-------------------------------------------------------------+
| Pete Fisher at Home: ***@ps-fisher.demon.co.uk |
| Voxan Roadster Gilera Nordwest Yamaha WR250Z |
| Gilera GFR * 2 Moto Morini 2C/375 |
+-------------------------------------------------------------+
Pip
2007-12-13 16:14:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Older Gentleman
I'm surprised nobody has mentioned the Molesworth books yet.
http://www.stcustards.free-online.co.uk/intro.htm
--
Pip: B12
Ferger
2007-12-12 19:42:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lady Nina
I'll leave UKRM to add to the list. They are the same as a plate of
comfort food.
Saki. About the only thing I can recall reading whilst qualifying as a
child that I'd still show any interest in today. Everything else I read as
a child was shit (Billy Brewster shit, Enid Blyton shit, Dr Who shit,
Tolkien shit etc etc Anything about trolls, goblins or elves shit.) Or
books for hard of thinking adults: Stephen King, James Herbert, Jeffrey
Archer etc.

Hang on...John Wyndham. There're probably others, but not that really
qualify as children's books.
--
F

Sprint RS "Big Yellow"
COO#1
Gyp
2007-12-12 17:56:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lady Nina
Now I'm getting the urge to step away from the computer and read so
I'll leave UKRM to add to the list. They are the same as a plate of
comfort food.
The Red Paint by Albert Saunders and The Ladybird Book of Motor Cars
1963.
--
Gyp
Change to dotcom to reply
Harry Bloomfield
2007-12-12 22:59:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lady Nina
Following a comment by Simian that it had been over 28 years since he
read the hobbit I was thinking that it must be about the same and
thinking about my early reading. I vaguely remember the Janet and John
books. I know by the time we were living in Oxford (so I was 6/7) I'd
got to the end of the Primary school reading scheme. Then I started to
eat up the real books.
One of Kipling's was my first good, proper read.
--
Regards,
Harry (M1BYT) (L)
http://www.ukradioamateur.co.uk
Harry Bloomfield
2007-12-12 23:02:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Harry Bloomfield
Post by Lady Nina
Following a comment by Simian that it had been over 28 years since he
read the hobbit I was thinking that it must be about the same and
thinking about my early reading. I vaguely remember the Janet and John
books. I know by the time we were living in Oxford (so I was 6/7) I'd
got to the end of the Primary school reading scheme. Then I started to
eat up the real books.
One of Kipling's was my first good, proper read.
Then I seem to remember reading a lot/all of H G Wells.
--
Regards,
Harry (M1BYT) (L)
http://www.ukradioamateur.co.uk
Paul Corfield
2007-12-13 00:03:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lady Nina
Following a comment by Simian that it had been over 28 years since he
read the hobbit I was thinking that it must be about the same and
thinking about my early reading.
I have no recollection of reading any books other than factual ones in
my childhood. The first fiction I ever read was for English Literature
at school and I can't remember what books they were - clearly didn't
make any sort of impression. I certainly don't own any books from that
time.

I somehow feel somewhat deprived given all the stuff others have read.
Oh and I've never read a word of a Tolkein book.
--
Paul C - "the big camp bastard" (tm d.a.r.s.y)
VFR800 | ZX6R | R1150GS
BOD#5, two#4, BOTAFOT#23, BOTAFOF#4, URMSBC#09, COFF#09
Admits to working for London Underground!
Bear
2007-12-13 00:04:24 UTC
Permalink
In article Paul Corfield said ...
Post by Paul Corfield
I somehow feel somewhat deprived given all the stuff others have read.
Oh and I've never read a word of a Tolkein book.
I'll get wronged for saying this, but LOTR is actually worth a go.

Honest.
--
Bear
Lozzo
2007-12-13 00:07:31 UTC
Permalink
Bear says...
Post by Bear
In article Paul Corfield said ...
Post by Paul Corfield
I somehow feel somewhat deprived given all the stuff others have read.
Oh and I've never read a word of a Tolkein book.
I'll get wronged for saying this, but LOTR is actually worth a go.
Honest.
Great films....gave me time for a few hours well needed kip while they
kept my then girlfriend busy watching.
--
Lozzo
Triumph Daytona 955i SE
Suzuki SV650 K3
Honda CBR600 F-W
Yamaha SR250 SpazzTrakka
Suzuki GSX-R750L
The Older Gentleman
2007-12-13 08:44:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lozzo
Bear says...
Post by Bear
In article Paul Corfield said ...
Post by Paul Corfield
I somehow feel somewhat deprived given all the stuff others have read.
Oh and I've never read a word of a Tolkein book.
I'll get wronged for saying this, but LOTR is actually worth a go.
Honest.
Great films....gave me time for a few hours well needed kip while they
kept my then girlfriend busy watching.
Fantasising about Legolas, more like.

"Lozzie, speak Elvish for me...."
--
BMW K1100LT 750SS CB400F CD250 CB125 SL125
GAGARPHOF#30 GHPOTHUF#1 BOTAFOT#60 ANORAK#06 YTC#3
BOF#30 WUSS#5 The bells, the bells.....
chateau dot murray at idnet dot com
MikeH
2007-12-13 09:11:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by Lozzo
Bear says...
Post by Bear
In article Paul Corfield said ...
Post by Paul Corfield
I somehow feel somewhat deprived given all the stuff others have read.
Oh and I've never read a word of a Tolkein book.
I'll get wronged for saying this, but LOTR is actually worth a go.
Honest.
Great films....gave me time for a few hours well needed kip while they
kept my then girlfriend busy watching.
Fantasising about Legolas, more like.
"Lozzie, speak Elvish for me...."
"and come indoors. You'll catch your death sitting out there on that
mushroom."
<sound of tiny feet rushing in>
"Oh. It's a fishing rod. Never mind then."
--
Mike H
GSX750F
Champ
2007-12-13 09:05:29 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 13 Dec 2007 00:03:31 +0000, Paul Corfield
Post by Paul Corfield
I have no recollection of reading any books other than factual ones in
my childhood. The first fiction I ever read was for English Literature
at school
I'm kinda boggled by this - you only read factual books as a child? No
Janet and John? No Enid Blyton? What sort of bedtime stories were
you read before you could read, FFS!? Perhaps "Railway Development:
Impacts on Urban Dynamics"[1] ?


[1]
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Railway-Development-Impacts-Urban-Dynamics/dp/3790819719/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1197536636&sr=1-2
in case you want to re-live some childhood memories.
--
Champ
I don't know, but I been told, you never slow down, you never get old
ZX10R | GPz750turbo | GSX-R600 (race)
neal at champ dot org dot uk
Eddie
2007-12-13 09:21:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Champ
On Thu, 13 Dec 2007 00:03:31 +0000, Paul Corfield
Post by Paul Corfield
I have no recollection of reading any books other than factual ones in
my childhood. The first fiction I ever read was for English Literature
at school
I'm kinda boggled by this - you only read factual books as a child? No
Janet and John? No Enid Blyton? What sort of bedtime stories were
Impacts on Urban Dynamics"[1] ?
Shush, don't spoil it for him; he still thinks "The Railway Children" is
a true story.
--
Eddie ***@deguello.org

His: ZX-9R, Elefant 900 http://www.last.fm/group/ukrm
Hers: Monster S4R, GSX600F (breaking, everything must go!)
Paul Corfield
2007-12-13 20:05:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eddie
Post by Champ
On Thu, 13 Dec 2007 00:03:31 +0000, Paul Corfield
Post by Paul Corfield
I have no recollection of reading any books other than factual ones in
my childhood. The first fiction I ever read was for English Literature
at school
I'm kinda boggled by this - you only read factual books as a child? No
Janet and John? No Enid Blyton? What sort of bedtime stories were
Impacts on Urban Dynamics"[1] ?
Shush, don't spoil it for him; he still thinks "The Railway Children" is
a true story.
Do I? That's news to me then. Apart from a short trailer for the film
version I've not seen the film and couldn't tell you what happens in it.

And I used to think you were a nice person!

<flounce>
--
Paul C - "the big camp bastard" (tm d.a.r.s.y)
VFR800 | ZX6R | R1150GS
BOD#5, two#4, BOTAFOT#23, BOTAFOF#4, URMSBC#09, COFF#09
Admits to working for London Underground!
Eddie
2007-12-13 21:06:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Corfield
Post by Eddie
Shush, don't spoil it for him; he still thinks "The Railway Children" is
a true story.
Do I? That's news to me then. Apart from a short trailer for the film
version I've not seen the film and couldn't tell you what happens in it.
There were some children, that lived near a railway. That's all I know.
Post by Paul Corfield
And I used to think you were a nice person!
<flounce>
Sheesh, some people are so sensitive.
--
Eddie ***@deguello.org

His: ZX-9R, Elefant 900 http://www.last.fm/group/ukrm
Hers: Monster S4R, GSX600F (breaking, everything must go!)
The Older Gentleman
2007-12-13 21:46:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Corfield
Do I? That's news to me then. Apart from a short trailer for the film
version I've not seen the film and couldn't tell you what happens in it.
Heresy.

It has Sally Thomsett and Jenny Agutter[1] dressed as Edwardian
schoolgirls.

Oh, ah, right......

[1] She was better in Walkabout, thobut.
--
BMW K1100LT 750SS CB400F CD250 CB125 SL125
GAGARPHOF#30 GHPOTHUF#1 BOTAFOT#60 ANORAK#06 YTC#3
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chateau dot murray at idnet dot com
Paul Corfield
2007-12-13 22:12:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by Paul Corfield
Do I? That's news to me then. Apart from a short trailer for the film
version I've not seen the film and couldn't tell you what happens in it.
Heresy.
It has Sally Thomsett and Jenny Agutter[1] dressed as Edwardian
schoolgirls.
Well I know that - that's always on every trailer for the film.
--
Paul C - "the big camp bastard" (tm d.a.r.s.y)
VFR800 | ZX6R | R1150GS
BOD#5, two#4, BOTAFOT#23, BOTAFOF#4, URMSBC#09, COFF#09
Admits to working for London Underground!
Ferger
2007-12-13 23:32:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Older Gentleman
[1] She was better in Walkabout, thobut.
ITYM 'she had her tits out in Walkabout'. Not necessarily the same,
although not discernibly different either.
--
F

Sprint RS "Big Yellow"
COO#1
Lozzo
2007-12-14 00:29:41 UTC
Permalink
The Older Gentleman says...
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by Paul Corfield
Do I? That's news to me then. Apart from a short trailer for the film
version I've not seen the film and couldn't tell you what happens in it.
Heresy.
It has Sally Thomsett and Jenny Agutter[1] dressed as Edwardian
schoolgirls.
Oh, ah, right......
[1] She was better in Walkabout, thobut.
She was only 16 when Walkabout was fimed
--
Lozzo
Triumph Daytona 955i SE
Suzuki SV650 K3
Honda CBR600 F-W
Yamaha SR250 SpazzTrakka
Suzuki GSX-R750L
Paul Corfield
2007-12-13 10:14:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Champ
On Thu, 13 Dec 2007 00:03:31 +0000, Paul Corfield
Post by Paul Corfield
I have no recollection of reading any books other than factual ones in
my childhood. The first fiction I ever read was for English Literature
at school
I'm kinda boggled by this - you only read factual books as a child? No
Janet and John? No Enid Blyton? What sort of bedtime stories were
Impacts on Urban Dynamics"[1] ?
Well you'll have to remain boggled then. I have no recollection of
books like Janet and John or Enid Blyton. I might have been read
bedtime stories but again I don't remember them either. I can't
recall school books either. I think this may well be why I have an
under developed appreciation of fiction writing.

There's no need for the sarcy references to railway books. I didn't
have any technical books when I was young. As for most children I had
things like Labybird books or I Spy books that taught you about all
sorts of things like nature, animals, the world around you and things
like cars and trains. I don't see that I was unusual in having those
sorts of books.

Paul Corfield
(via Google)
The Older Gentleman
2007-12-13 10:50:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Corfield
ilway books. I didn't
have any technical books when I was young. As for most children I had
things like Labybird books or I Spy books
I *loved* the Ladybird books because the pictures in them always
depicted "real" toys. You could identify your own Dinky or Hornby toy
from the illustrations.
--
BMW K1100LT 750SS CB400F CD250 CB125 SL125
GAGARPHOF#30 GHPOTHUF#1 BOTAFOT#60 ANORAK#06 YTC#3
BOF#30 WUSS#5 The bells, the bells.....
chateau dot murray at idnet dot com
Paul Corfield
2007-12-13 20:10:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by Paul Corfield
ilway books. I didn't
have any technical books when I was young. As for most children I had
things like Labybird books or I Spy books
I *loved* the Ladybird books because the pictures in them always
depicted "real" toys. You could identify your own Dinky or Hornby toy
from the illustrations.
And it appears I have three old "Observers" books - a car one from 1959
and a car one from 1972 and a commercial vehicles edition from 1966.
Most of the manufacturers have vanished and been lumped into the few
remaining "big groups".
--
Paul C - "the big camp bastard" (tm d.a.r.s.y)
VFR800 | ZX6R | R1150GS
BOD#5, two#4, BOTAFOT#23, BOTAFOF#4, URMSBC#09, COFF#09
Admits to working for London Underground!
Andy Bonwick
2007-12-13 19:36:00 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 13 Dec 2007 02:14:13 -0800 (PST), Paul Corfield
Post by Paul Corfield
Post by Champ
On Thu, 13 Dec 2007 00:03:31 +0000, Paul Corfield
Post by Paul Corfield
I have no recollection of reading any books other than factual ones in
my childhood. The first fiction I ever read was for English Literature
at school
I'm kinda boggled by this - you only read factual books as a child? No
Janet and John? No Enid Blyton? What sort of bedtime stories were
Impacts on Urban Dynamics"[1] ?
Well you'll have to remain boggled then. I have no recollection of
books like Janet and John or Enid Blyton. I might have been read
bedtime stories but again I don't remember them either. I can't
recall school books either. I think this may well be why I have an
under developed appreciation of fiction writing.
I don't remember owning any Enid Blyton books but I can remember
reading ones at my grandparents house that had previously been read by
my mother and uncles. Those same books are still in a bookcase in the
front room and my 80 something year old uncle who lives there now has
never thrown them away.

I worked my way through many a Biggles (1) book when I visited on
Sundays and used to put a bookmark in and return to carry on with the
book the next week. I never asked to take the books home with me
because they were there for all the grand children to read. The only
shame is that when said uncle pops his clogs they'll probably end up
in a skip somewhere or one of my more money orientated cousins will
snaffle them and punt them out on Ebay.

(1) Are books relating to shooting animals or the filthy Hun
considered unacceptable these days?
The Older Gentleman
2007-12-13 21:46:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andy Bonwick
(1) Are books relating to shooting animals or the filthy Hun
considered unacceptable these days?
They're reprinting all the old Commando war comics, so I reckon not.

One of the greatest surprises of my (then) young life was discovering,
on holiday in Italy in the 1960s, that Italy also published the same
sort of trashy war comic.

Only these featured brave, heroic all-conquering Italian men-of-war.
Even at the age of 10 or so, I knew something was wrong.
--
BMW K1100LT 750SS CB400F CD250 CB125 SL125
GAGARPHOF#30 GHPOTHUF#1 BOTAFOT#60 ANORAK#06 YTC#3
BOF#30 WUSS#5 The bells, the bells.....
chateau dot murray at idnet dot com
Andy Bonwick
2007-12-13 22:00:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by Andy Bonwick
(1) Are books relating to shooting animals or the filthy Hun
considered unacceptable these days?
They're reprinting all the old Commando war comics, so I reckon not.
I saw something about that the other day and wondered if I'd be able
to resist buying one if I saw them for sale.
Post by The Older Gentleman
One of the greatest surprises of my (then) young life was discovering,
on holiday in Italy in the 1960s, that Italy also published the same
sort of trashy war comic.
Only these featured brave, heroic all-conquering Italian men-of-war.
Even at the age of 10 or so, I knew something was wrong.
Anyone who went to war using bi-planes can't have been that much of a
coward.
The Older Gentleman
2007-12-13 22:21:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andy Bonwick
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by Andy Bonwick
(1) Are books relating to shooting animals or the filthy Hun
considered unacceptable these days?
They're reprinting all the old Commando war comics, so I reckon not.
I saw something about that the other day and wondered if I'd be able
to resist buying one if I saw them for sale.
I spent a blissful half-hour in Waterstones leafing through them.
Remember Battler Britton?
Post by Andy Bonwick
Post by The Older Gentleman
One of the greatest surprises of my (then) young life was discovering,
on holiday in Italy in the 1960s, that Italy also published the same
sort of trashy war comic.
Only these featured brave, heroic all-conquering Italian men-of-war.
Even at the age of 10 or so, I knew something was wrong.
Anyone who went to war using bi-planes can't have been that much of a
coward.
Fairey Swordfish, anyone?
--
BMW K1100LT 750SS CB400F CD250 CB125 SL125
GAGARPHOF#30 GHPOTHUF#1 BOTAFOT#60 ANORAK#06 YTC#3
BOF#30 WUSS#5 The bells, the bells.....
chateau dot murray at idnet dot com
Wicked Uncle Nigel
2007-12-13 22:26:04 UTC
Permalink
Using the patented Mavis Beacon "Hunt&Peck" Technique, The Older
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by Andy Bonwick
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by Andy Bonwick
(1) Are books relating to shooting animals or the filthy Hun
considered unacceptable these days?
They're reprinting all the old Commando war comics, so I reckon not.
I saw something about that the other day and wondered if I'd be able
to resist buying one if I saw them for sale.
I spent a blissful half-hour in Waterstones leafing through them.
Remember Battler Britton?
Post by Andy Bonwick
Post by The Older Gentleman
One of the greatest surprises of my (then) young life was discovering,
on holiday in Italy in the 1960s, that Italy also published the same
sort of trashy war comic.
Only these featured brave, heroic all-conquering Italian men-of-war.
Even at the age of 10 or so, I knew something was wrong.
Anyone who went to war using bi-planes can't have been that much of a
coward.
Fairey Swordfish, anyone?
Gloster Gladiator, Henschel HS-123, Arado AR68...
--
Wicked Uncle Nigel - "He's hopeless, but he's honest"

WS* GHPOTHUF#24 APOSTLE#14 DLC#1 COFF#20 BOTAFOT#150 HYPO#0(KoTL) IbW#41
SBS#39 OMF#6 Enfield 500 Curry House Racer "The Basmati Rice Burner",
Honda GL1000K2 (Fallen apart) Suzuki TS250 "The Africa Single"
Norton 850 Commando Kawasaki GTR1400
Andy Bonwick
2007-12-13 22:49:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by Andy Bonwick
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by Andy Bonwick
(1) Are books relating to shooting animals or the filthy Hun
considered unacceptable these days?
They're reprinting all the old Commando war comics, so I reckon not.
I saw something about that the other day and wondered if I'd be able
to resist buying one if I saw them for sale.
I spent a blissful half-hour in Waterstones leafing through them.
Remember Battler Britton?
Bastard. I'll probably be spending some of Saturday wandering around
Kendal and I think they've got a Waterstones in the town centre.
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by Andy Bonwick
Post by The Older Gentleman
One of the greatest surprises of my (then) young life was discovering,
on holiday in Italy in the 1960s, that Italy also published the same
sort of trashy war comic.
Only these featured brave, heroic all-conquering Italian men-of-war.
Even at the age of 10 or so, I knew something was wrong.
Anyone who went to war using bi-planes can't have been that much of a
coward.
Fairey Swordfish, anyone?
I'm sure the Italians also had a carrier launched bi-plane they used
to kill off anyone brave enough to fly in them.

Anyone flying a bi-plane off a carrier had to be worthy of being
called a hero imo.
Alan
2007-12-13 23:25:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by Andy Bonwick
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by Andy Bonwick
(1) Are books relating to shooting animals or the filthy Hun
considered unacceptable these days?
They're reprinting all the old Commando war comics, so I reckon
not. >> >
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by Andy Bonwick
I saw something about that the other day and wondered if I'd be
able >> to resist buying one if I saw them for sale.
Post by The Older Gentleman
I spent a blissful half-hour in Waterstones leafing through them.
Remember Battler Britton?
Bastard. I'll probably be spending some of Saturday wandering around
Kendal and I think they've got a Waterstones in the town centre.
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by Andy Bonwick
Post by The Older Gentleman
One of the greatest surprises of my (then) young life was
discovering, >> >on holiday in Italy in the 1960s, that Italy also
published the same >> >sort of trashy war comic.
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by Andy Bonwick
Post by The Older Gentleman
Only these featured brave, heroic all-conquering Italian
men-of-war. >> >Even at the age of 10 or so, I knew something was
wrong. >>
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by Andy Bonwick
Anyone who went to war using bi-planes can't have been that much
of a >> coward.
Post by The Older Gentleman
Fairey Swordfish, anyone?
I'm sure the Italians also had a carrier launched bi-plane they used
to kill off anyone brave enough to fly in them.
Anyone flying a bi-plane off a carrier had to be worthy of being
called a hero imo.
The Swordfish squadrons did quite well too, they crippled the Italian
fleet at Tarranto and stopped the Bismark from escaping her pursuers.
Six aircraft attacked the three German cruisers that dashed through the
English channel but all of them were shot down by covering fighters,
the leader, Lt Cdr Esmonde, was awarded a posthumous VC. Brave men
indeed.
--
Alan
ZX10R - Green of course
Tiger - A pleasant shade of green
SD
2007-12-13 23:30:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by Andy Bonwick
Anyone who went to war using bi-planes can't have been that much of a
coward.
Fairey Swordfish, anyone?
Our old CC president flew one of them. On *that* day. Missed.
--
| ___ Salad Dodger
|/ \
_/_____\_ GL1500SEV/CBR1100XXX/CBX1000Z
|_\_____/_| ..93550../..25068.../..31928.
(>|_|_|<) TPPFATUICG#7 DIAABTCOD#9 WG*
|__|_|__| BOTAFOT #70 BOTAFOF #09 PM#5
\ |^| / IbW#0 & KotIbW# BotTOS#6 GP#4
\|^|/ ANORAK#17 IbB#4 YTC#4 two#11
'^' RBR Clues: 00 Pts:0000 Miles:0000
b***@despammed.com
2007-12-13 22:09:11 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 13 Dec 2007 21:46:00 +0000 in uk.rec.motorcycles, The Older
that Italy also published the same sort of trashy war comic.
Only these featured brave, heroic all-conquering Italian men-of-war.
Even at the age of 10 or so, I knew something was wrong.
heh
--
Ian
Colin Irvine
2007-12-13 22:58:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Older Gentleman
Post by Andy Bonwick
(1) Are books relating to shooting animals or the filthy Hun
considered unacceptable these days?
They're reprinting all the old Commando war comics, so I reckon not.
I'd forgotten them - what we used to call "trash mags". I loved them.
Post by The Older Gentleman
One of the greatest surprises of my (then) young life was discovering,
on holiday in Italy in the 1960s, that Italy also published the same
sort of trashy war comic.
Only these featured brave, heroic all-conquering Italian men-of-war.
Even at the age of 10 or so, I knew something was wrong.
The ones I used to read changed in the late 50s from having Germans as
the enemy to what were generally described as "gooks". These mags were
not nearly as good, and I couldn't understand why the change. It was a
couple of decades later that I realised this coincided with the Korean
war and that it was propaganda at work.
--
Colin Irvine
YZF1000R BOF#33 BONY#34 COFF#06 BHaLC#5
http://www.colinandpat.co.uk
Halla
2007-12-13 01:11:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lady Nina
Following a comment by Simian that it had been over 28 years since he
read the hobbit I was thinking that it must be about the same and
thinking about my early reading. I vaguely remember the Janet and John
books. I know by the time we were living in Oxford (so I was 6/7) I'd
got to the end of the Primary school reading scheme. Then I started to
eat up the real books.
<grumble> I was told that other day that all my childhood books, which
were stolen away from me and stuck in the loft, have probably gone
mouldy due to roof malfunction. I am unchuffed. </grumble>
Howard
2007-12-13 10:47:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lady Nina
Following a comment by Simian that it had been over 28 years since he
read the hobbit I was thinking that it must be about the same and
thinking about my early reading. I vaguely remember the Janet and John
books. I know by the time we were living in Oxford (so I was 6/7) I'd
got to the end of the Primary school reading scheme. Then I started to
eat up the real books.
Primary school prize: Brother Blackfoot by Alan Sullivan
Keep it for years after reading it the once and being most
impressed.

Found it recently on Amazon and was again impressed that it
stood the test of time (50 ish years, it's all relative).

Otherwise everything in the library on archery and glove
making !
--
www.davidhowardjeweller.co.uk
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